Mailing the Thank You Letter

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Mailing the Thank You Letter

What should I put in a thank you letter? Should I be even sending it, and if yes, then when is the most appropriate time to do so? How should I voice my thanks? These and much more are the queries that trouble even the most experienced job seekers. The reason being not that you don't know how to thank a company, but the fact that you don't have the words to do so. As always, to free you from this tight fix we are here with some secrets that can relieve your worry of coming up with a thank you letter that you are often obliged to send.

Diving into the topic, the first thing you need to clear yourself is the timing. A thank you letter is not sent after you receive the confirmation of your job.

Rather, it is emailed immediately after your interview, to thank the hiring company for consideration. A simple note of gratitude expressing your experience with the company. Furthermore, sending a thank you letter doesn't necessarily mean that you immediately enter into the good books of your employer. On the contrary, if the hiring manager was not impressed by you, it is unlikely the thank you note will even make a difference.

So, does this mean that the letter is useless? Definitely not. Like voicing a thank you to any member of your family, it really doesn't matter whether you say it or not, but if you do, it highlights your polished grooming and your ethics. Also, you may never know who is seated at the other end of the deal.

What if the employer is one those people who are extremely particular about manners and proper protocol. It is far better to play it safe and send a thank you as a courtesy, instead of being sorry later.

Moving on to the actual content of the letter, there are certain trends to follow. You start by thanking the company for the opportunity and relate how exceptional it was to be a part of the process. You can then add certain bits from the interview that could have gone amiss at that time and explain them up a bit. Be wary, however, as rambling on too much about your mistakes can hurt the chance of you getting the job as well. You also have to bear the length of your letter in mind. Don't extend it to go on forever. Write in a pleasant tone and keep it simple. For such pieces, less is definitely more.

Remember, originality is key. If you adopt a sample letter from the net, it will lack your own voice and do more damage than good. Such letters often circulate the employer's inbox and are usually fished off by them as forgeries. Make an effort, try to come up with your own words and ways to write it. Combined with all the above suggestions and guidelines, you can set out to make an attempt. It may take a few tries at first, but believe us, you will surely get it in the end. After all, it's just thanking someone, how hard can it be?